Recreational Drone Flyers

You are considered a recreational user if you fly your drone for fun. It is important to know when and where you can fly and how to register your drone. The FAA has recently updated rules for recreational use of drones.
For a full list of FAA rules for recreational use of drones please visit https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_fliers/.

One very important new rule to note is that flight in controlled airspace is temporarily limited.
For the Chippewa Valley Regional Airport, controlled airspace is airspace within 5 miles of the airport, and recreational use of drones is temporarily prohibited! The FAA is upgrading the online system, known as LAANC (the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability), so that recreational operations can get automated airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This system is currently only available for certified Part 107 drone pilots.

In the meantime, Do NOT fly in controlled airspace (around and above many airports) unless:

You are flying at a recreational flyer fixed site that has an agreement with the FAA (there are currently no fixed sites approved within 5 miles of the Chippewa Valley Regional Airport). The FAA has posted a list of approved sites (PDF) and has depicted them as blue dots on a map. Each fixed site is limited to the altitude shown on this map, which varies by location.

NOTE: Flight in controlled airspace is temporarily limited to these fixed fields. The FAA is upgrading the online system, known as LAANC (the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability), so that recreational operations can get automated airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This system is currently only available for certified Part 107 drone pilots.

NOTE: If your organization is interested in establishing a letter of agreement for a fixed flying site, please contact us at ajt-9-uas-integration@faa.gov.

 

Part 107 Certified Pilots and/or Commercial Operators

If you have a small drone that is less than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following Part 107 guidelines.

Under part 107, drone pilots planning to fly in controlled airspace must get permission from the FAA. You can submit requests for authorization to fly in controlled airspace near airports via the following two systems. LAANC is now available for requests to operate within EAU Class D Airspace for Part 107 operators!

  1. Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC)
  2. DroneZone

For more information on flying under Part 107 operations visit https://www.faa.gov/uas/commercial_operators/.